Ambient Weather AW-YG737S-RD Admiral Fitzroy Storm Glass and Galileo Thermometer

Ambient Weather AW-YG737S-RD Admiral Fitzroy Storm Glass and Galileo Thermometer

Amazon.com Price: $21.99 (as of 04/10/2018 18:20 PST- Details)

During the historic voyage, FitzRoy carefully documented how the storm glass would predict the weather: If the liquid in the glass is clear, the weather will be bright and clear.
If the liquid is cloudy, the weather will be cloudy as well, perhaps with precipitation. If there are small dots in the liquid, humid or foggy weather can be expected.
If the liquid is cloudy, the weather will be cloudy as well. If there are small dots in the liquid, humid or foggy weather can be expected. A cloudy glass with small stars indicates thunderstorms. If there are large flakes, it will be snowy in the winter.

Description

This beautiful conversation piece combines two ancient technologies – the Admiral Fitzroy Storm Glass and the Galileo Thermometer.

The Admiral Fitzroy Storm Glass:

How this storm glass really works is a mystery, but it is believed that electromagnetic changes in weather patterns activate crystals inside (sealed-glass chamber fills with crystals when air pressure decreases). Famed meteorologist Admiral Fitzroy used a storm glass on a historic voyage (1831-1836) with Charles Darwin

A storm glass works on the premise that temperature and pressure affect solubility, sometimes resulting in clear liquid; other times causing precipitants to form. However, the method by which this works is not fully understood. Although it is well-established that temperature affects solubility, some studies have simultaneously observed several different storm glasses forming similar crystal patterns at different temperatures. In addition, sealed glasses are not exposed to atmospheric pressure changes and do not react to the pressure variations associated with weather systems.

The Galileo Thermometer:

The Galileo thermometer consists of a sealed glass tube that is filled with water and several floating bubbles. The bubbles are glass spheres filled with a colored liquid mixture.

Attached to each bubble is a little metal tag that indicates a temperature. These metal tags are calibrated counterweights. The weight of each tag is slightly different from the others. Since the bubbles are all hand-blown glass, they aren’t exactly the same size and shape.

The bubbles are calibrated by adding a certain amount of fluid to them so that they have the exact same density. So, after the weighted tags are attached to the bubbles, each differs very slightly in density (the ratio of mass to volume) from the other bubbles, and the density of all of them is very close to the density of the surrounding water.
During the historic voyage, FitzRoy carefully documented how the storm glass would predict the weather: If the liquid in the glass is clear, the weather will be bright and clear.
If the liquid is cloudy, the weather will be cloudy as well, perhaps with precipitation. If there are small dots in the liquid, humid or foggy weather can be expected.
If the liquid is cloudy, the weather will be cloudy as well. If there are small dots in the liquid, humid or foggy weather can be expected. A cloudy glass with small stars indicates thunderstorms. If there are large flakes, it will be snowy in the winter.
Dimensions: Approximately 8″ tall
Galileo Thermometer: Number of glass balls: 5, Glass Galileo thermometer range: 64ºF – 80ºF, Temperature is determined by lowest floating bulb